ORCHID OVERSIZED HIGH-LOW SWEATER TUTORIAL

 TOP: MADE BY ME (TUTORIAL BELOW) SIMILAR TOP HERE, HERE AND HERE | PANTS: A PEA IN THE POD (SAME PANTS, NON MATERNITY HERE) | HEELS: NORDSTROM | CLUTCH: MADE BY ME (TUTORIAL HERE) SIMILAR HERE | SUNGLASSESS: URBAN OUTFITTERS | NECKLACE, WATCH, SIMILAR LARGE CUFF, BANGLE 

I am completely drawn to anything that is this gorgeous vibrant orchid color lately. I grabbed some of this lightweight knit down at the fabric district months ago, and finally pulled it out to make this comfy top. I have a top similar to this that I love, so I used it to make this pattern. I added a little extra length to it to make sure it would be long enough to carry me through my entire pregnancy.

The tutorial is pretty simple, and the pattern consists of lots of straight lines (yay!) The best part about creating something oversized is that the dimensions of your pattern don’t have to be too exact. The knit I used is really lightweight and a little sheer (I have to wear a tank top underneath it), which is perfect for this time in spring, when it isn’t quite sweltering heat yet.

Shop this look below, and make sure to click through at the bottom for the full tutorial!

And if you don’t already follow along with me on instagram, come join in! I’d love to have you! 

MATERIALS:

  • 1 1/2 yards of thin sweater knit
  • matching thread
  • fitted tee to use as a pattern
  • pattern paper (optional)
  • serger (optional)



STEP 1:
Fold your fabric in half so that your stretch runs width-wise, and lay your fitted tee (folded in half length-wise) on your fabric to use as a guide. You can also do this step on pattern paper first, and then place the actual pattern on top of your fabric.

The nice thing about this pattern is that it is mostly straight lines, and is is loose, so you don’t have to worry about being super accurate. Trace a lower neckline for the front, a higher neckline for the back. For the top of the sleeve on your main pattern piece, draw a straight diagonal line about 10″ long.  Then draw a straight line down for the sleeve opening about 3-4″ wider than your actual arm. Mine measured 7″ wide on this pattern piece. Then create a small low curve and continue a line straight down. You want your front pattern piece slightly shorter than your back piece. My front pattern piece measured 19″ long from the arm hole to the bottom, and 18″ long from the base of the neckline down. Make sure to create a slight curve upward toward the center of the middle front. This will help give you the high-low effect.

For the back pattern piece, I used the same measurements, except I made the neckline higher, and the length of the pattern piece measured 19″ long from the arm hole to the bottom (this needs to be the same measurement as your front piece so they match up when sewing them), and 28″  long from the base of the neckline down. Feel free to lengthen or shorten this.

With the same arm hole opening measurements you used with your front and back pieces, cut two sleeves. Keep them pretty short, mine were 9 long.

Cut one long strip for the bottom hem about 3″ wide, two shorter strips for the sleeve cuffs about 2″ wide, and one about 2 1/2″ wide for the neckline. Make your neckline piece 2″ shorter than the actual neckline hole measurement.

STEP 2: 
With right-sides together, lay your front piece on your back piece and serge/stitch from the neck to the top of the sleeve.

STEP 3:
Attach both sleeves (see illustration)

STEP 4:
With top inside-out, stitch from under the arm, down the sides.

STEP 5:
Stitch the two short ends of your cuffs together to create 2 circles of fabric. Fold one side of those circles down all around the cuff and press, so that you have on side that is folded, and the other side with 2 raw ends. Match up the raw ends with the ends of your sleeve (with the fold pointing toward your top), and serge or stitch around, connecting your sleeve cuff to your sleeve.  Do this for both sleeves.

STEP 6:
Stitch the two short ends of your neckline together to create a circle of fabric. Fold one side down all around the neckline and press, so that you have on side that is folded, and the other side with 2 raw ends. Match up the raw ends with the edges of your neckline. Pin your neckband to your neck on opposite sides first, stretching your neckband as you go (see illustration), and serge or stitch around, connecting your neckband to your neck.


STEP 7:
Stitch the two short ends of your bottom band together to create a circle of fabric. Fold one side down all around and press, so that you have on side that is folded, and the other side with 2 raw ends. Match up the raw ends with the edges of your hem. Pin  and serge or stitch around, connecting your bottom band to your hem.